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Nephrotic Syndrome


Nephrotic Syndrome

Kidneys receive approximately 1 liter of blood every minute. Of this, about 100 ml gets filtered in the kidney. This contains, small molecules and few large molecules. This is due to the intricate cellular structure that prevents proteins from getting filtered into the urinary space. A derangement of this filter results in passage of heavy amounts of proteins in urine. This condition is called Heavy Proteinuria or Nephrotic syndrome or Nephrosis.

Definition:

In the urine, the protein excretion is > 3.5 gm/day or in children, it is >50mg/kg of body weight. In most cases, the serum albumin is <3gm/dl (normal>4), and passage of lipids in the urine. The lipids in the blood increase and swelling of face and feet also occur.

Causes of Nephrotic Syndrome:

In children, most cases are due to Minimal Change Disease, FSGS, MPGN etc. In adults, most cases are due to primary illness while upto 30% may be due to secondary illness.

Clinical Features:

Apart from Edema, there is a tendency towards clotting of the blood in blood vessels. If this involves a critical area, like the heart, brain or kidney complications may occur. Infections also are common. 

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